AFROPUNK

... the other Black experience

Joining the Afro Punk community wasn't a hop on the bandwagon type of thing. My friends didn't ( and still don't) understand the movement. My family thought that I was just doing anything to be defiant. Coupled with the fact that I don't know any other punks from Cleveland. I felt like just walking away from the movement. It wasn't until I found out my mother was a fellow punk , I gave it another chance . Am I the only one who feels like the odd one out in this community sometimes ?

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@Unique~well put.
@Shemaiah~welcome.
I agree that its hard to come out in the open with the movement. Especially since there's so many different aspects going on within it. I was unfortunately brought up in a almost all white community with a hatred for black people and differences. It sucked but I got through and so will you. Don't give up on this and always live by what you feel right. Fellow believers will come along in no time.

I feel the need to hold back a little , especially because of my faith. I would never judge or put some one down for their religion or lack thereof , neither would I try to force it down one's throat. It just seems a little cold.



Chris Asrk-pa Addanc said:

@Unique~well put.
@Shemaiah~welcome.
  Thank you.

Your faith is yours to do with as you please,it should never hold you back. Use your faith to its full advantage and walk in it. Then you'll have no worries. I used to be sooo shy it hurt. Then I came to a point where I just meditated on what the problem really was and it wans;t my surroundings or the people it was me not willing to show everyone what I really believed in. It sounds like its a simple step but it was one of teh hardest journeys I'm still going through. Not caring about others opinion of you (including friends) is very very hard but when you live in what you believe in people begin to respect you and accept you for it.

    I've been pretty much a loner all my life so being the only black into rock n roll for miles and miles around never bothered me. The reason it didn't is because I had no love for the alternative_  the inner city hoodlum bullshit. I LIKED being different. Sure I caught pure D hell for it but it never made me want to join the fools that hated me_ why in  the world would I want to do that?

   You can't surrender the world to the dumb-asses.

   Also, what's this talk about "the movement"? Afro Punk may be a movement in some political and social cirlcles but it is and always has been just one thing for me: who I am. If the s.o.b.'s in my niegborhood knew anything about Spookycreep, they knew that I listened to that "white boy shit" and didn't give a fuck what any of them thought about it. I have no confusion concerning who my life belongs to._ should black people listen to rock n roll? This was never a question, even open to debate in my mind.

   But after discovering Afro Punk it's nice as hell to know there is an army of us. Even nicer is the MF bands. That there were other blacks into rock n roll, I was sure of. Occasionally I'd run into one or, like in the AP movie, afterwhile some would come out of the woodwork and own up to liking a particular artist or rock song. What really surprised me_ and made me jump for joy I might add_ was the bands. I hadn't expected this. The younger generation_ you bitches_ got it going on!

  So buck up. You may be in solitude, but thanks to this website, there's no way you can beieve that you are alone. Like the B 52 song says: Others, like you!

  

  

  

thank you! i feel odd ball too. like i am the only one that gets it. or doesnt get it. hmmm..blerp

you not alone, its hard out here for everyone i've always been one of the throw away's cause i refuse to package myself neatly in a box of what everyone else thinks i should be because of my skin. but keep your head up and you got fam on here and we here for ya.

I moved to Dayton last year. I am from Akron, where blacks have populated the NE Ohio punk scene for decades. I don't think that's the case here. i get those stares of "hey, there's a black dude, hanging out in this rock club." I think it sucks, that i have to start all over again. And i'm too old.

 

If you are feeling out of place in Cleveland, follow:

This Moment In Black History

the Drexels

National Suicide Day

C.D. Truth - one of my bands

Obnox

the Waitresses

and more...

I feel like this all the time. I don't even know if I fit into the afro-punk category, to be quite honest. Yeah o.k I'm black. And I've been listening to rock since I was in grade school (I'm 25 soon to be 26). But not all (majority) rock I listen to is classified as punk. And if you look at me, you wouldn't even know I listen to rock. No tats no, unique piercings, or mohawk (because we all know people like to stereotype). In fact, when most people discover which genre of music I listen to, they give me this look like I just told them I have smallpox. Then it's coupled up with the comment of, "Oh..... wow, I never really took you for someone who likes THAT TYPE OF MUSIC." Some of my family thinks I'm a devil worshiper because I listen to TOOL. I've even had people tell me it's just a phase that I'll grow out of.  So yeah.....it's a feeling felt too often felt. And I especially feel like the odd one out now that I've moved to another state (I'm from Ohio- now I live in Minnesota). Everyone in the area where I live listens to country western. But when it all boils down to it, I am what I am and wouldn't change it for a thing.  As long as you're happy that's all that matters.

I know what you're talking about. I don't have anyone in my life that actually relates to this or myself. And though I share the sentiment, I don't feel like I fit in here. Often I find that every little part of the world is like its own clique, Afro-Punk included, and I'll just never be able to assimilate into any of them.

I'm from Cleveland too, btw. Is that Tower City in your picture? It looks familiar, anyway.

Yes, I was in the food court ! lmao

Indigo Sweater said:

I know what you're talking about. I don't have anyone in my life that actually relates to this or myself. And though I share the sentiment, I don't feel like I fit in here. Often I find that every little part of the world is like its own clique, Afro-Punk included, and I'll just never be able to assimilate into any of them.

I'm from Cleveland too, btw. Is that Tower City in your picture? It looks familiar, anyway.

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