AFROPUNK

... the other Black experience

I came across a few articles today, one was model Lara Stone in black face for French Vogue http://nymag.com/daily/fashion/2009/10/french_vogue_shoots_lara_sto... , another a Dutch magazine calling Rhianna a ni***bitch http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/12/20/rihanna-called-n-word-in-_... , and most recently French Elle saying that black people didn't have style until the Obama administration http://www.afrosomething.com/article/quand-le-magazine-elle-parle-d... . How is the rest of the world viewing us, that they would think any of this is acceptable?!?!?!? 

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We are in a dangerous time in the world. Racism NEVER went away and nor is it going anywhere, but now openly being racist is fair game. There was a time people would laugh in our face and call us ni***ers behind close doors. Now people are doing it in public in the name of politics or fashion or even God. It's a hot pot that is going to boil over...soon...

So you see these out in the open remarks from ignorance what steps are you all going to take in real time to abolish this clownery?

Will you boycott the magazine?
Will you boycott the model and "creative" "designer"?
Will you take a comment about style before Obama to heart?
Will you inform the less fortunate about this prejudice?

OR! Will you get mad today and fall into the fad and allure of advertisements tomorrow??

   It's really a messed up situtation. It's like Cypher from the AP documentray said, at the end of the day it is only black people that will have your back not THEM. It's a hard and ugly truth, given the state of things. Below is a picture from a Japanese film called Vampire Girl vrs. Frankentstien Girl. The Japanese actress in black face here is the leader of a group of five or four Japanese girls who belong to a "Black Girl's Club"_ apparently they wanted to be black. These girls are characterized as loud mouthed, angry all the time and every other word out their mouths is a curse word.

   I don't believe that this is an example of what Japanese people think of black people so much as it is an example of what they think about the mainstream, hip hop street black. I say this because Michael Jackson was big over there and they couldn't have thought that he was like the clowns protrayed in the film. But alot of the hip hop Bozos are and this is the message THEY put out.

The japanese are 50/50 in my opinion, they love our hip-hop but sometimes still portray us in a over-exaggerated light.
I still love their cuisine, anime, and mangas though (/:r
That edi is old, but anyway things like that are funny to me bc ppl of the African diaspora are trendsetters. These fashion people watch what black ppl wear; walk the streets and flip through photos...then turn around and grab Elements for thier editorials or runway shows  (usually styles from the hood). Then the masses worship these trends meanwhile they were the same ones laughing at it in the first place. Black ppl are also a bit blind sometimes as well bc they too embrace the trend that they invented themselves, but to them it's okay if a fair face has it like 'YAY were official now'. That is why I get pissed off when these street wear brands put no colored ppl in thier catalog and blacks eat it all up.....SMH. 

^^^Isn't that kray though? I have a song that talks about the exact same phenomenon you just described. What you just said pretty much describes a huge chunk of american popular culture in general. Black folks copying white folks that were copying black folks to began with. And usually not copying us all that good I should add. And then capatilism commodifies this third generation product and sells it back to us at triple the price of the original prototype. It's actually quite interesting. lol 

It's sad that racism in America (and around the world) is still a reality in 2012 but honestly, i'm glad that this type of ignorance is coming to the light. Now there is no way of denying what's going on or pretending that we live in some completely benevolent world. When i see these articles i am completely dumbfounded and a part of me is angry and i accept that. Unfortunately to be black and angry is often looked down upon. But i think that all the world should get angry more often and stop pretending that everything is okay. That's what's going to motivate the change that needs to happen.

Thanks for your response! 

 

I also believe in practicality and i'm not saying that people should walk around being angry. Not at all. But i don't think that there is anything wrong with initial feelings of anger prompting social change. It's all about how that anger is channeled. I'm sure that lots of political movements (civil rights movement, womens liberation, anti-vietnam, occupy wall street) didn't start because their leaders felt lukewarm about the issues at hand. Those leaders had fire running through their veins. They surely were "upset" about social injustice. I just think that we should embrace that fire and use it to solve problems peacefully and with love. I am a bit of a hippie ;)
 
fructose soda said:

seems to me that there are tooooo many angry people.

I'm not sure if the problem is that more people aren't angry enough.

we can be proactive without getting upset.

ofcourse, I'm just coming from a basic/ practical point-of-view.    In my personal life, I work with youth that've been in foster homes & "juvenile camps", and what I've learned from my own experience is that you can't be of any good to people when you're angry.     Its not the anger that helps solve anything.    Its being calm.    Positive energy.    I aint a hippy tho.    Feel me?

... whateva helps, tho.     I don't know everything.

Lavita said:

But i think that all the world should get angry more often and stop pretending that everything is okay. That's what's going to motivate the change that needs to happen.

On another interesting not, a couple years I found online Vogue Black which is run by Vogue Italia.
I love their articles and photo spreads featuring all kinds of Blacks in fashion and art world. I find it funny that it's from an Italian division of Vogue and not US, because a lot of who is reported on are American black women and men, and some on the U.K.

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